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Blood and Marrow Transplant: Staff

Jessica Shand

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Jessica Shand

Biography: Jessica Shand received a Master of Health Science degree in Molecular Microbiology and Immunology from the Johns Hopkins University in 1999, after which she worked in the biodefense industry studying the cytokine response to emerging pathogens. She then graduated in 2006 with an M.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo, as a member of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Honor Society. As a medical student, she participated in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute-National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program, where she earned the Continuing Support Fellowship Award for her research in mechanisms of B-cell associated tolerance to tumor antigens in the laboratory of Dr. Crystal Mackall. In 2009, she completed a Residency in Pediatrics with Distinction in Research from the University of Rochester. She also received an American Society of Hematology Trainee Award for her research in differential gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following allogeneic bone marrow transplant under the mentorship of Dr. Craig Mullen. She also began her current position as a liaison to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Pediatric Research. Since July 2009, Dr. Shand is a Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology through the Johns Hopkins University/National Cancer Institute Joint Fellowship.

Research: Her research focuses on understanding the role of host antigen expression on the graft-versus-tumor effect after allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Specifically, she aims to extend an existing preclinical murine solid tumor model of allogeneic transplant to include a high-risk leukemia in order to study the impact of alloreactivity on the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

Selected publications:

1. Fry TJ, Shand JL, Milliron M, Tasian SK, Mackall CL. Antigen loading of DCs with irradiated apoptotic tumor cells induces improved anti-tumor immunity compared to other approaches. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 2009 Aug;58(8):1257-64.

1. Fry TJ, Shand JL, Milliron M, Tasian SK, Mackall CL. Antigen loading of DCs with irradiated apoptotic tumor cells induces improved anti-tumor immunity compared to other approaches. Cancer Immunol Immunother. 2009 Aug;58(8):1257-64.

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